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February 14, 2023

Nitric Oxide: Saying YES to NO

What is Nitric Oxide?

Nitric Oxide (NO) is a natural compound found in our bodies that works to widen blood vessels and stimulate certain hormone releases. Besides eating foods high in nitric oxide, the two most common nitric oxide supplements are L-arginine and L-citrulline. You can also find supplements that use specific natural blends, such as Berkeley Life.

What is Nitric Oxide good for?

Because NO has shown to relax and widen blood vessels, it can be used for several different things.

  • Erectile Dysfunction (ED)
    • Limited blood flow to the sex organs can be responsible for symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Nitric Oxide can help increase blood flow to the genitals.
    • While you may be taking a PDE5 inhibitor, like Viagra and Cialis, these medications do not create Nitric Oxide in the body. If there is little to no Nitric Oxide available, it is possible that circulation of blood flow is not sufficient enough for sexual or erectile function. 40% of people taking PDE5 inhibitors may not see results because of this. 
    • When you support your body’s Nitric Oxide production, you are improving blood flow to your sex organs, and helping with adequate arousal & lubrication.
  • Female Sexual Arousal Disorder (FSAD)
    • Did you know FSAD affects up to 70% of women, with at least 25% of women are unable to reach an orgasm? While this typically happens as we age, we all know aging is unavoidable.
    • NO plays a lot of roles in the female body. It works to increase blood flow to the clitoris and vagina. Nitric Oxide can help improve dilate the blood vessel to improve and increase circulation, so that the female body can react to arousal, engorgement, and lubrication (and orgasms). It also acts as a neurotransmitter to release oxytocin (our ‘Love Hormone’).
  • Neuropathy (Nerve Pain)
    • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication of diabetes and effects 70% of diabetes within 5 years of diagnosis. Eventually, almost all diabetics will be affected by DPN.
    • Nitric Oxide is linked to the neuropathy because of lack of blood flow and because NO is also a neurotransmitter in some autonomic fibers. NO is incredibly important for nerve pain, as it increases blood flow, oxygen, and nutrients to your cells.
  • Other reported benefits include:
    • Reducing blood pressure/improving heart health
    • Improving gut health
    • Improving hormone levels
    • Enhancing exercise and recovery
    • Immune health

Are there risks or side effects to Nitric Oxide?

  • Typically, there are little to no side effects. If side effects do occur, they are very mild. These include diarrhea, stomach upset, nausea, and headache.
  • People should not take Nitric Oxide if they have cirrhosis, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, and/or low blood pressure. You should also use caution if you have a history of heart attack.

At Flatirons Family Pharmacy & Wellness, we have set up a Nitric Oxide Program to help patients who are struggling with any of the above. 

During your initial 30-minute, private consultation with our trained pharmacist, you will be able to test your Nitric Oxide levels in-office (via saliva test strip), develop a personalized health plan, and receive a month’s supply of Berkeley Life Nitric Oxide supplements. You will be able to have follow-ups as needed. Book an appointment today: https://app.acuityscheduling.com/schedule.php?owner=21637456&calendarID=7965209

Berkeley Life Nitric Oxide supplements are also available for purchase without consultation. 

For more information, contact our Clinical Pharmacist, Angie Peterson, Pharm.D. at 303-827-3480 or angiep@flatironsrx.com

Resources

1. Berkeley Life | The Nitric Oxide Experts. https://www.berkeleylife.com/
2. Nitric oxide supplements: Benefits, effectiveness, and risks. www.medicalnewstoday.com. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326381#how-they-work
3. Musicki B, Liu T, Lagoda GA, Bivalacqua TJ, Strong TD, Burnett AL. Endothelial Nitric Oxide synthase regulation in female genital tract structures. J Sex Med. 2009;6 Suppl 3(S3PROCEEDINGS):247–253. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2008.01122.x

 

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